Technological Innovation in EFL

(OU  H817 Activity 6)

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The world of EFL is a wide one which is populated with people from every back ground imaginary, however, within this work force, in my opinion  there are number of camps;

·         those who are fully open to new technology and actively seek out ways to incorporate it into their services by using; Twitter to comment , doodle to organize , personal blogs, Skype for remote teaching, Facebook pages with interactive content to engage

·         those who are partly open to new technology, using lap tops in lessons with internet connection allowing instant translations etc, showing You Tube videos for listening and comprehension, having a Facebook page open to students to joint

·         those who are unable to (through lack of finance or other restrictions) or reluctant to use the modern technology available, viewing it with a skepticism often borne out of the belief that too much of today’s technology actually distracts from the real issues of learning second languages.                                                                                                                                                 This is  a link to Jeremy Harmers´ blog, jeremyharmer.wordpress.com/2010/10/10/no-dogma-for-efl-away-from-a-pedagogy-of-essential-bareness/
who questions  Scott Thornbury`s  original   posit; that less is sometimes more ( my own analysis)

Personally I  feel that I fall between the first two. I am open to new innovation, but I don´t actively incorporate that much into my services at the moment.

Many of the organisations that I am involved with here in Frankfurt, Germany are in a similar position as me. They now have WI-Fi available to students and employees, but the take up and use of social media, for example, is low, or the home pages are so dense and difficult to use that they seem to act as a barrier rather than a door to the education establishment.

Finally, an informal straw poll recently revealed that most of my colleagues were against the use of many of the more commonly used software and concepts.

Are they right to be skeptical about taking up what’s on offer?

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